WorldStudio International
 

Projects

 
Entry Kitchen Living room
Entry Kitchen Living room
Living room Living room Living room to guest bath
Living room Living room Living room to guest bath
Guest bathroom Guest bathroom Office
Guest bathroom Guest bathroom Office
Master bedroom Master bedroom Master bathroom
Master bedroom Master bedroom Master bathroom
Guest bedroom Pool and patio Pool and patio
Guest bedroom Pool and patio Pool and patio
Pool and patio Pool and patio Pool and patio
Pool and patio Pool and patio Pool and patio
 
 
Like so many homes in Merida, this one, located in the La Ermita neighborhood, had seen better days. The house is situated on a brick-paved street, one of the most historic streets in the city that in the colonial era led to points north and south out of the city. Due to its historical importance, the street was one of the first to have the power cables buried. However, being on this important street did not mean that the house was well maintained. The shell of the house was completely dilapidated and the ever-present jungle had reclaimed the back yard long ago. Sagging beams, falling plaster, uneven floors and a hodgepodge floor plan were all that remained. Being on one of the few somewhat diagonal streets in the city meant that the plot and house were triangular in shape, rather than rectilinear. Rather than seeing this as a negative, the designers took the opportunity to work with the unusual plan: challenges like these almost always create a design opportunity. A sense of formality is created by the presence of the center foyer, giving onto the (rare) garage to one side, the tall kitchen to the other, and through to the living room and patio and pool straight ahead. No floors were salvageable in the house, so new cement floors were created throughout, with insets of a visually stimulating floor pattern in mosaico de pasta, but devoid of colors, leaving the walls free to take on the color without limit. These patterns outline forms in each room, and define the living and the dining sections of the large living room. Small "rugs" in front of the bathroom sinks define those areas as well. No doors or windows were salvageable, so a mixture of classic arches, Yucatecan solid wood doors, and walls of glass were used to brighten the tall spaces. Rock walls, called mamposteria, were left wherever they were, and extended in the patio area. This brings texture and substance to the newly built and perfect walls.
 
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